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INFO - PHOTO MAGAZINE EXTRA - photography magazine extra, photography, where to do, how to do, travel photography, Pam Goodyer

Photography Information

Lens: This is a wide-angle lens location.

When to go: This is the dark sky area. Only go when there is a new moon, or you will regret all of the milky way photos you missed out on at night time. If you don’t care about the Milky Way, you can go at any time but be sure the roads are open in the winter before going. Read about dark sky photography here.

Camera Settings

Aperture Priority – It is used to get your depth of field (control how much is in focus from your subject back). If your shutter speed drops to 1/30th of a second, it is because you lack light and you will need to put your camera on a tripod to avoid blurry pictures.

You might want the opposite effect. That is when your subject is in complete focus, and the background is totally blurred called the bokeh effect. You will use your lowest F-number such as 2.8, or 3.5. Go as small as your particular lens will allow.  Shooting in Aperture Priority allows you to control this.

Shutter Priority – If you have moving subjects you will want to shoot in shutter priority to be sure they come out clear.

Manual Mode – You have moving waters here. You can do your long exposure running, milky water shots like our picture above.  You will have to use a tripod for this effect.  All of your settings will vary depending on the lighting and what neutral density filter you have. You will shoot in manual mode for the milky waters. ISO is always 100 or as low as your camera will allow. Aperture is f22. Your shutter speed will vary depending on the light. Take some test shots to decide on your shutter speed after you put your neutral density filter on. (It’s like sunglasses for your camera to stop light from coming in). Use your live view mode to focus to lock the mirror up and avoid any camera movement. Use your shutter release or your 2-second timer to also prevent camera movement. Voila. You now have your milky water exposure. You will want at least a 2-second exposure for water. If you don’t have a neutral density filter, you may not get more than 1/15th of a second in the sun. That does not give you a good effect.

Gear: Bring your tripod and your circular polarizing filters. The circular polarizing filter will make your white puffy clouds burst and deepen the blue around them. It will also take the glare off of the water and replace it with reflection. Bring your tripod in case there is not a lot of light to work with to get your depth of field when desired. Don’t forget your neutral density filter to do long exposure shots of the moving water.

Gear List at a glance: Circular polarizing filter, neutral density filter, tripod, shutter release.

 

colony motel acadia n.p. showing a hotel and a car in the national park

The Colony’s Bar Harbor area cottages and Motel are located on a grand sweep of lawn overlooking Frenchman’s Bay. Our cottages are just a five-minute drive to Bar Harbor, and Acadia National Park. The Colony Cottages are ideally located to be a Bar Harbor haven or your Bar Harbor headquarters to the many attractions of Mount Desert Island. The Colony Cottages and Motel offers a little bit of everything for your Bar Harbor lodging – with a sense of yesterday; the privacy of a cottage or motel unit, and the opportunity to meet other guests. Relax as you enjoy our panoramic views of Bar Harbor’s very own Frenchman’s Bay.

How to Shoot Milky Way and Night Sky Photography

What you will need:

Light pollution maplight pollution map

Camera – You will need a camera that you can manually control your ISO, shutter speed, and aperture.

Lens – A fast wide-angle lens of 1.4 – 2.8 is ideal. If you use a 3.5 or higher (slower lens), you will have to increase the ISO. The higher the ISO, the more grain or digital noise or grain that will appear in your photos.

Tripod – A good sturdy tripod is essential for night photography. If it gets windy, you will need a sturdy one. Keep that in mind, when you buy one, it should be sturdy enough to withstand the wind but small enough to fit in your suitcase.

Sky Map – Sky Guide is available through the iTunes Store for $1.99. It has a 5 out of 5-star rating on both the current (3.2) version (1200+ ratings) and all previous versions (8600+ ratings).

Flashlight –  Our choice is Coast brand for flashlights. The ideal flashlight will have high lumens, and you will be able to zoom the in and out on the amount of light emitting from the flashlight. Get the HP7, PX45, or the G50. Ideally, go with the  HP7.

Moon Phaze Map – The best time to go is during a new moon, and you want to be in the darkest area possible. The week before the new moon when the moon has not risen is a perfect time to go, so be sure to check the moonrise chart to see when the moon will be up.

Remote Shutter Release – When painting with light and you want to go over a 30-second exposure, you must have a shutter release to use your bulb mode. When exposing your pictures in general, you can use the remote release, or you can use your camera’s built-in two-second timer.

Milky Way Photography

Use a Tripod – First of all you must be on a tripod. A good sturdy tripod is necessary if it is windy. If the tripod moves, your picture will blur.

Focus – Use live view.  To focus in the dark use your camera’s live view, hit the zoom button, and focus on a bright star. You can also use the infinity setting on your lens but do several test shots to see if it is accurate. It can be off a little on some lenses. You can also light it up with a flashlight, focus, then gently without touching the focus ring, put the camera in manual focus so it will not search for focus. You would have to do this each time you move your camera to take your next angel.

ISO – Start with ISO 1600 – 3200.  This is just a standard starting point, and you will adjust from here.

Shutter Speed – Remember the earth is rotating. If you leave the shutter open for too long, you will see star trails which will not make for a crisp image. We want crisp non-star trail images. Here is the formula to avoid star trails. The 500 rule – Divide 500 by the focal length of your lens. So, if you have a 24mm lens on a full-frame camera, you will set your shutter speed to 20 sec. (500/24 = 20.83). If you are using a crop sensor camera, first do the math of the crop sensor to find the focal length. Cannon is 1.6, Nikon is 1.5. Convert to full-frame focal length then use the formula. Nikon 18mm x 1.5= 27mm – 500/27 = 18.51 seconds.

Aperture – Depth of field isn’t critical on these shots but letting the light into the camera is, therefore you should shoot wide open if. If the depth of field is essential to you, try not to go to high. (wide open =the lowest aperture your camera will allow). You will have to increase the ISO some, which will give you digital noise.

White Balance – When in live view mode, you can change your white balance settings and see what it will look like. You can shoot in shade or cloud mode as a standard-setting and adjust things later.

When to view the Milkyway

The best images are usually of the dense part of the Milky Way. We can see this part of the milk way in the southern sky. During March, April and May, the milky way rises above the horizon in the pre-dawn hours. In June at about 10:00 p.m. you will see the milky way.  From July until October you can see the milky way as soon as the sunsets, and it becomes dark enough to see, which is about an hour after sunset. In November the milky way no longer comes above the horizon. You will have to wait until March if you want to stay away really late, or get up really early to see her again.

Photography Magazine Extra Pam Goodyer

Park and Area Information:

Entrance Fees: All park visitors are required to pay an entrance fee upon entry May–October. Passes are non-transferable. Credit cards are accepted at all fee collection areas.

Private Vehicle: $25 valid for 7 days
Admits private, non-commercial vehicle (15 passenger capacity or less) and all occupants.

Motorcycle: $20 valid for 7 days
Admits one or two passengers on a private, non-commercial motorcycle.

Per Person: $12 valid for 7 days
Admits one individual with no car.

Hulls Cove Visitor Center:
April 15 – October 31, open daily
April, May, June, September, and October: 8:30 am – 4:30 pm
July & August: 8 am – 6 pm

Seasonal Closings:

Park Loop Road:
Closed annually December 1 – April 14. Road opening may be delayed on years of heavy snow and ice. Two short sections remain open year-round.

Unpaved Roads:
Closed November 15 – May 15. For current conditions visit Road Closures.
Visit Trail Closures for information on closures associated with protecting nesting birds.

Winter Restrooms:
The following restrooms are open during winter operations:

  • Brown Mountain Parking Area
  • Eagle Lake Boat Ramp
  • Eagle Lake Carriage Road
  • Fabbri Picnic Area
  • Jordan Pond Boat Ramp
  • Parkman Mountain Parking Area
  • Sand Beach Parking Area

For a map of these restrooms, click here.

Photography Magazine Extra Pam Goodyer

Hotel Information:

No lodging is located inside the park but there are plenty of hotels just outside of the park. Here are Pam’s Picks for the best bang for the buck.

The Colony Cottages and Motel – 20 Route 3, Hulls Cove, Bar Harbor, ME, 04644, United States of America888-950-5062 – See the pictures and details above.

Colony Acadia Maine
food and dining photography magazine extra

 Restaurants

The Jordan Pond House Restaurant:

Located inside the park. This is where we stop to eat.

Address: Park Loop Rd, Seal Harbor, ME 04675

Phone:(207) 276-3316

Perry’s Lobster Shack:
1076 Newbury Neck Road
Surry, ME
207-667-1955 – This is where you go to do sunset photography and enjoy your incredibly fresh lobster dinner. Don’t go here and not have lobster.  I actually got up during dinner and did some sunset photography and came back. I was out on the deck. No one seemed to care. I could have shot it from my seat but of course, I needed just the right angle. There were a dock and a man fishing below to get in my sunset shot.

Perry’s is run by Perry and his wife Beverly. The lobster shack is on the side of Newbury Neck Road, with stairs leading to the town beach. Perry’s menu is simple, with fresh lobster, mussels, and corn on the cob.

camping photography magazine extra, photography, where to do, how to do, travel photography, Pam Goodyer

 

Camping

Blackwoods Campground

Located on Route 3 the campground is 5 miles (8 km) south of Bar Harbor. It is open all year, with the following restrictions:

  • May – October: Reservations recommended. Fee: $30 per site, per night.
  • April and November: Weather permitting, Fee: $10 (self-registration)
  • December – March: A limited number of campsites are available for primitive camping only in the offseason at Blackwoods. During this time campers must obtain a camping permit from the dispatch at park headquarters (8 am – 4:30 pm daily). Facilities are limited to a hand pump for water and a portable toilet. The campground entrance road is closed to automobiles during this time; campers are required to hike in from the campground entrance on Route 3. Campers must pack out all trash. Fee: Free. For more information, visit the Winter Camping page.

 

Schoodic Woods Campground

Located on the Schoodic Peninsula, this campground is 3 miles (5 km) southeast of Winter Harbor. It will open in 2015 from September until Columbus Day. After this season, it will be open from late May until Columbus Day. The entire campground will be first come, first served this year. Reservations for following years are highly recommended.

Fee (per site, per night): $22 walk-in tent sites, $30 drive up tent/small RV, $36 RV with electric only sites, $40 RV with electric and water. Discounts available for Senior and Access (Permanent Disability) pass holders.

Reservations for Blackwoods and Seawall Campgrounds
Reservations for individual sites are handled by the National Recreation Reservation Service (NRRS), not the park.  By Phone
877-444-6777
877-833-6777 (TTY)
518-885-3639 (International)
888-448-1474 (Customer Service)

Online
www.recreation.gov

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